Dowty Boulton Paul - Customers

Photographs showing the end uses of Dowty Boulton Paul components with its customers.

Apart from the supply of aircraft components for military or commercial usage, DBP supplied other customers, including Austin Healey body panels, helicopter winches, food trays, cable laying machinery for undersea and military equipment.

Austin Healey - body panels supplied by Boulton Paul
Original photo in the Dowty archive at the Gloucestershire Heritage Hub
Austin Healey - body panels supplied by Boulton Paul
Original photo in the Dowty archive at the Gloucestershire Heritage Hub
Aston Martin DBS fitted with with body parts moulded on Boulton Paul presses
Original photo in the Dowty archive at the Gloucestershire Heritage Hub
Original photo in the Dowty archive at the Gloucestershire Heritage Hub
Helicopter Winch
Original photo in the Dowty archive at the Gloucestershire Heritage Hub
Hecla Class Admiralty vessel pennant number A319, HMS Bulldog.
Original photo in the Dowty archive at the Gloucestershire Heritage Hub
Food Tray pressed parts
Original photo in the Dowty archive at the Gloucestershire Heritage Hub
Original photo in the Dowty archive at the Gloucestershire Heritage Hub
Space Tank
Original photo in the Dowty archive at the Gloucestershire Heritage Hub
Concorde Order Sheet

Comments about this page

  • Hello Les… many thanks for the correction, we will edit the caption accordingly….

    By John Redfern (19/03/2021)
  • The ship you show is not a Cable Laying Vessel.
    This is the Hecla Class Admiralty vessel pennant number A319, HMS Bulldog. Marconi were developing a stabilised underwater sonar known as Hydrosearch around 1974-77. The idea was that if the sonar head was stabilised and could be automatically actuated so that, as it swept an area, the head stayed on its fixed sweep even if the vessel itself was being buffeted and thrown about by the seas.
    The cylindrical actuation module holding the sonar head was designed and made by Dowty Boulton Paul and fitted in the fore hull of this vessel in a tube together with a power supply externally. When not in use it retracted into the vessel. The equipment was a success and discovered sunken items not normally noticed including an alleged sunken U-Boat. Its most popular scans were of the submarine M2 in Lyme Bay.
    The fact that this sort of computer control, so that the equipment moved but the head could stay still in space, could be done (the exact opposite of a normal crane) led to the company later becoming involved with the BAe Skyhook/Skydrant projects.

    By Les Whitehouse (18/03/2021)

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